Mélange Aux Simanim aka Sephardic Chickpea Carrots Leeks and Squash Stew

It is traditional to eat certain symbolic foods on Rosh Hashanah. Among some of the symbolic foods are leeks, carrots, and gourds. So, rather than make each item separately, I made a few dishes to combine some of the symbolic foods and make them part of the meal.

Our guest, Manny, coined the name of the dish, which I thought was very funny. He and his wife Judy are among our favorite guests.

Ingredients:

2 cups chickpeas, cooked (or 1 can rinsed and drained)

4 leeks, sliced

4 carrots, sliced diagonally 

½ butternut squash, peeled and cubed 

1-2 cloves fresh garlic, crushed 

1 teaspoon ginger

½ teaspoon turmeric, paprika, cumin,

Salt and pepper to taste

Water to cover

Instructions:

Sauté leeks, and add rest of ingredients. Add water to cover. Bring to a boil and simmer until done. This can also be made in a crockpot.

I ran out of canned chickpeas, so I cooked the chickpeas first in the pressure cooker for 40 minutes.

Adjust seasoning as preferred.

Here is a picture:

  

May we be sealed in the book of life and blessed with a sweet, healthy and good new year!

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12 thoughts on “Mélange Aux Simanim aka Sephardic Chickpea Carrots Leeks and Squash Stew

  1. Lynz Real Cooking September 21, 2015 at 12:28 PM Reply

    Very beautiful dish!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Osyth September 21, 2015 at 6:54 PM Reply

    Lovely mix of spices … it has a north african feel to it 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. koolkosherkitchen October 19, 2016 at 7:44 PM Reply

    I love this recipe, and I missed this post somehow! I hope your Yomim Tovim are going well!
    I have been remiss in not letting you know that I have nominated you for a Blogger Recognition Award. I apologize, and here is the link https://koolkosherkitchen.wordpress.com/2016/10/10/an-award-a-tag-a-soup/. You are not in any way obligated to accept, and I fully understand that not everyone has the time and inclination to participate in these self-and-others-promoting exercises. Therefore, I will truly appreciate if you accept the nomination, as I sincerely think you deserve it, but I won’t get offended if you don’t. Nominating each one of you is my way of giving credit to some exceptional bloggers and perhaps attracting attention to your work.
    Chag Sameach to you and yours,
    Dolly

    Liked by 1 person

    • Cooking For The Time Challenged October 19, 2016 at 9:13 PM Reply

      Thank you so much for thinking of me! I made it again this year and it was a hit! I love our new sukkah! And now, it is located right off of the kitchen. What a difference.😊 How about you??

      Liked by 1 person

      • koolkosherkitchen October 19, 2016 at 10:40 PM

        The Sukkah shrank by two feet because the palm trees have grown too much. For the same reason it moved about three feet away from the porch, so as to have completely open space. But it is beautiful, the weather is cooperating so far B”H, so we are enjoying ourselves immensely. I love Sukkos!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Cooking For The Time Challenged October 19, 2016 at 11:26 PM

        Me too. Do you know how to make taygalach? I loved them when I was a kid. We only ate them on Sukkot, but I have never made them from scratch.

        Liked by 1 person

      • koolkosherkitchen October 19, 2016 at 11:30 PM

        I do, but I didn’t have time to make them for this Yom Tov. Do you mean making teigalach and then putting them together into a fludn?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Cooking For The Time Challenged October 19, 2016 at 11:37 PM

        I don’t know what a fludn is.🤔My memory was that teigalach were honey dough balls with coconut on top. I have never seen them here, and most people don’t know what they are. I saw something similar around Easter time when I worked in an Italian neighborhood, but it was a cone shape with candy coated almonds.

        Liked by 1 person

      • koolkosherkitchen October 20, 2016 at 12:01 AM

        We didn’t have coconuts, and we did make them into a cone (Mount Sinai) shape by cooking teigalach with raisins and almonds (rozhinkes mit mandlen, like in a song).

        Liked by 1 person

      • Cooking For The Time Challenged October 20, 2016 at 2:14 AM

        How interesting! I guess we had a inauthentic variation. That explains why I’ve never seen it elsewhere.

        Like

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