Monthly Archives: January 2016

Chickpeas and Spinach Masala

I am learning so much from having this blog. I feel very grateful for the exposure to other cultures that this platform provides.

One of my friends, Tamar, requested a recipe with spinach. This recipe is a blend of 2 recipes, one from Gloria at plateitupblog.wordpress.com. Gloria’s recipe is for potatoes and spinach. Here is the link to her blog:

https://plateitupblog.wordpress.com/2015/10/20/aloo-palak-potato-spinach-medley/

My second source of inspiration is from Parul Singhal, from her recipe Aloo Mutar Masala, posted earlier.

Here is a link to the original post on her blog:

https://gharkepakwan.wordpress.com/2015/12/28/aloo-matar-masala/

Essentially, I used the same method and seasoning from Aloo Mutar, substituting spinach and chickpeas for peas and potatoes. I am hoping that this will be still relatively authentic.

I made some adaptions, to accommodate more readily available local ingredients.

Chickpeas and Spinach Masala

Ingredients

1 lbs. chickpeas

1 onion, chopped

1 can diced tomatoes

1 teaspoon fresh grated ginger

1 teaspoon cumin, turmeric,

1 tablespoon coriander, salt

1/2 teaspoon garam masala

red pepper flakes to taste

16 oz. bag of frozen spinach

2 cloves fresh garlic, crushed

chopped fresh cilantro

Water to cover, or water to beans in 3:1 ratio if using pressure cooker.

Instructions

Today, I had chickpeas already prepared. These instructions would also work if using canned chickpeas.

Step 1: Sauté onion, fresh ginger, cumin, turmeric, coriander, red pepper flakes, salt, until fragrant. Add chickpeas, tomatoes and water. Simmer to blend flavors.

Step 2: Add spinach, garlic, and garam masala and adjust seasoning and heat through.

Step 3: Before serving, add chopped cilantro.

Stove top: Sauté onion, fresh ginger, cumin, turmeric, coriander, red pepper flakes, salt, until fragrant. Add chickpeas, tomatoes and water. Bring to boil and let simmer until done. Add spinach, garlic and garam masala and adjust seasoning.

 

Pressure Cooker: Sauté onion, fresh ginger, cumin, turmeric, coriander, red pepper flakes, salt, until fragrant. Add chickpeas, tomatoes and water and cook for 40 minutes to pressure and then release the pressure quickly by running cold water over the lid when done. 

Add spinach, garlic and garam masala and adjust seasoning.

Crockpot:  Sauté onion, fresh ginger, cumin, turmeric, coriander, red pepper flakes, salt, until fragrant. Add chickpeas, tomatoes and water and place in crockpot. Cook on low until beans are cooked.  Cook with enough water to cover the beans. 

Add frozen spinach, crushed fresh garlic and garam masala and adjust seasoning.

Before serving, add chopped cilantro.

Here are the pictures:

   
 
  
   
  

My husband said, “Wow! This is awesome! Throw that on a bed of rice, and we have delicious!” So, I consider that to be a vote of confidence.

I suspect that fresh spinach would bump this up to an even higher level of culinary excellence, but, I am time challenged, and I have my limits.

Even more incredible, I never could have done this prior to blogging. This has opened me up to a whole new world! Amazing!

Thank you Gloria and Parul! I hope that I did your recipes justice!

 

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Lentil Soup

This past Saturday, we were supposed to go away to visit friends. However, due to the anticipated snow storm, we ended up staying home for Shabbat. Instead of cholent, I made lentil soup.

Ingredients:

1 lbs lentils

1 lbs stew meat

1 onion, chopped

2 stalks celery, chopped

3-4 carrots, peeled and chopped

1 parsnip, peeled and chopped

3 potatoes, peeled and quartered

2 bay leaves

1 tablespoon salt, to taste

1 teaspoon pepper,  to taste

1 teaspoon cumin

2 cloves garlic, crushed

Water to cover. If using the pressure cooker, use 3:1 ratio of water:lentils

Optional: add chopped fresh parsley or cilantro before serving

Instructions

Sauté onions, carrots, celery and parsnips. Then add the spices, meat and lentils and continue to sauté until fragrant. Add potatoes, bay leaves and water.

Stove top: bring to boil and let simmer until done. Add garlic and adjust seasoning.

Pressure Cooker: 7 minutes to pressure and then release the pressure quickly by running cold water over the lid when done.

Crockpot: Cook on low until done. When using a crockpot, less water is required.

Before serving, adding chopped cilantro or parsley adds a nice gourmet touch.

This week, as I was time challenged, I just added all the ingredients into the crockpot and let it simmer all day. When I got home I adjusted the seasoning.

This can easily be made vegetarian by omitting the meat.

Yaffa could hardly wait to have it, and ate it for a snack!

Frankly, it came out great, but, Raizel is visiting my mother, so, I do not have any robust eaters at home.

Enjoy!

Putting It All Together: Basic Daily Food Plans

Putting It All Together: Creating Basic Daily Food Plans

Please note: This is not to be considered medical advice. I am merely passing on information that I have accumulated over the years. Everyone is unique and has their own personal experience. For any questions or concerns, I recommend consulting your health care provider.

In my previous post, I described all the various food exchanges for each food group. Now, I am going to try and describe how to take that information, and turn it into an individualized food plan.

Please keep in mind, however, that “one size does not fit all.” A food plan depends on each person’s unique circumstances.

Depending on age, body size, activity level and metabolism, a person might need more food to sustain their energy level and to avoid physical hunger. Another person, given their unique circumstances, might need less food.

There also needs to be some flexibility. For some people, on days when they are more physically active, they might need to adjust their food intake accordingly. There are so many options! It is a live-and-learn process.

Based on my previous post on food exchanges, this is my summary of daily serving ranges for the various food groups:

Summary of Daily Recommendations

Now, taking the summary of daily recommendations, this is my summary of a rough outline of making a personalized food plan:

Basic Food Plan Correctsd

 

From this, it becomes possible to make your own personal food plan.

If anyone would like to create their own food plan, I created this picture to help keep track of the necessary food groups:

Create your own personalized plan of eating

For an individual meal, I created this picture to write your food plan:

Individualized Meal Plan

I hesitate to make a more concrete example for a food plan, since everyone is so unique, and has their own needs. But, for the sake of clarity, for someone who is trying to lose weight, a food plan could be:

Breakfast: 2 oz. nuts, 1/4 cup uncooked cereal, 6 oz. yogurt and 1 medium fruit.

Lunch: 3/4 cup cooked beans, 1 cup salad, 1 cup cooked vegetables and 1 tablespoon oil.

Dinner:   4 oz. chicken, 1/2 cup cooked rice, 1 cup salad, 1 cup cooked vegetables and 1 tablespoon oil.

There is an art and a science to determine the correct amount of food one requires. This is a flexible and fluid process. It depends on so many factors!

I have known people to eat 2 cups of salad for lunch and dinner as well. So, I recommend having a reasonable amount of food and then monitoring your weight on a weekly, bi-weekly or monthly basis. Based on your progress, you can add or deduct food to your daily regime according to your results.

Writing about healthy eating for the time challenged has proven to be a daunting task!

I have a few more subtopics connected to this subject, but writing about recipes and cooking is really much more fun!

Please note: This is not to be considered medical advice. I am merely passing on information that I have accumulated over the years. Everyone is unique and has their own personal experience. For any questions or concerns, I recommend consulting your health care provider.

Here is a PDF of all the pictures and charts of this topic so far:

Cooking For The Time Challenged food plans

References: The list is endless!  I just hope that I didn’t forget anything!

eat-well-bien-manger-eng

print_eatwell_bienmang-eng

view_eatwell_vue_bienmang-eng

USDAFoodPatternsSummaryTable

revisedfoodsmart

FGPPamphlet

ld90772_dailymealplanguide

calreqtips

intake

adhd_bklt

Food_Choices_and_Serving_Sizes_AMD

FoodLists

FoodMood

foodmoode2

healthyportions

 

 

Creating A Food Plan: Serving Sizes & Food Exchanges

Creating A Food Plan: Servings Sizes and Food Exchanges

Please note: This is not to be considered medical advice. I am merely passing on information that I have accumulated over the years. Everyone is unique and has their own personal experience. For any questions or concerns, I recommend consulting your health care provider.

Over the years, nutrition has been an area of interest. I spend a lot of time helping others professionally and personally eat a healthy diet and maintain a proper body weight.

When Yaffa was a baby until age 8, she was failure to thrive and on a feeding tube. We spend a lot of time calculating every calorie, in our effort to help her grow and thrive.

Now that Raizel is a teenager, she is eating better. But, for the longest time, we struggled to achieve healthy growth and development with her too.

My husband is one of the fortunate few for whom maintaining a healthy body weight is not a struggle. But, health maintenance is a priority.

After my pregnancies, it was a struggle to find a food plan that worked for me. Pregnancy was certainly not good for my waistline!

As I was preparing to write this post, I think I inadvertently “bit off more than I could chew,” if you will pardon the pun. I have come to understand just how confusing it is to create an easy and healthy food plan. There is so much conflicting and confusing information!

The original exchange plan, developed for diabetics, and used by many weight loss programs is the easiest and healthiest food plan method to use. It is based on individual food categories, which include Grain/Starch, Protein, Fruit, Vegetables, Milk, Fat and Other Carbohydrates (includes sweets and alcohol). Within each category, one may substitute or exchange one portion of food for another.

Using this method, one can create an individualized food plan to accommodate one’s specific needs and lifestyle. Menu planning is flexible, easy and still nutritious.

Simple is best!

Principles For Healthy Eating 

I have integrated the concept of food exchanges with my own personal views of health and well-being.

As I listed above in my picture, I believe that healthy eating includes:

・Balancing intake in all food groups

・Little or no refined sugars or flours

・Using whole grains

・No artificial flavors, sweeteners,

・No dyes, additives or preservatives

・No hydrogenated oils/fats

・Limiting animal protein to <6 oz./day

In my experience, white flour and sugar affect the mood and feelings of well-being in people who are sensitive. I call this being “carbohydrate sensitive.” For “carbohydrate sensitive” people, refined flour, sugar and even fruit can trigger mood swings. Therefore, in my food exchange lists, I have calculated serving sizes based on whether or not someone is carbohydrate sensitive or not.  For ease, I suggest sticking to either one or the other and to be consistent.

I am a slightly carbohydrate sensitive person. I personally avoid refined sugar and flour. For this reason, I also prefer to eat vegetables over fruit. I believe that this has made a world of difference for me. I attribute part of my ability to cope with the stress of having special needs children to my diet.

Other people find it difficult to digest fat. For this reason, I believe in eating healthy, preferably unsaturated fats. We do not eat  products with partially-hydrogenated fats/oils.

My daughter used to be on the Feingold Diet. From this, we learned to eliminate dyes, additives, preservatives and artificial flavors including artificial sweeteners from our diet. In people who are sensitive, artificial flavors, dyes and preservative function as what I call “neurotoxins.”  I loved the Feingold Diet. I found that it did wonders for my daughter!

Finally, I believe in limiting animal protein– eggs, fish, poultry and meat to no more than 6 oz. per day. Other protein sources should be plant-based or dairy.

Personally, I am allergic to dairy, and I use milk from other sources.

I think that I want a little over board, but, I made the pictures to help clarify what the choices are within each food category.

 

Dairy Servings

 

 

Dairy
• 1-3 servings/day (optional)

• Are you carb sensitive?

• If yes, then 1 serving is:

– 8 oz milk

– 6 oz yogurt

If NOT carb sensitive, 1 serving is:

– 8 oz milk/ 6 oz. yogurt

– 4 oz. cottage cheese,

– 2 oz. hard cheese.

 

 

Protein subtle

Protein

• 6-13 or more servings /day

• Limit animal protein to 3-6 oz./day

• Are you carb sensitive?

• IF NOT THEN: 1 oz. fish, chicken , cottage cheese, meat, 1 egg, 1.5 oz. tofu/cooked beans, ½ oz. nuts, ½ oz. hard cheese

• IF YES THEN 1 serving is 1 oz. chicken, fish or meat, 1 egg, 2 oz. cottage cheese or ricotta cheese, ¼ cup or 2 oz. cooked beans, 1 oz. regular tofu or 2 oz. soft/silken tofu, 1 Tbs. peanut butter, 1 oz. nuts & hard cheese = 2 oz. protein

• Super Carb Sensitive? Count legumes as a carbohydrate

• In this diet, red meat is eaten no more than 1/week; chicken, fish & eggs are eaten 2-3 times per week. Therefore,1-2 meals /day must be vegan or plant-based.

 

Grain Servings Suble

Grains

• 1-8 servings/day

• 1 serving is 1 oz. raw cereal or grain

• Are you carb sensitive?

• Not carb sensitive then 1 serving is 1 slice bread, ½ cooked pasta, potatoes, rice, 1 oz. dry cereal, 4 oz. cooked potatoes, yams; 3 oz. cooked grains

• Carb sensitive: ½ cup cooked corn, peas, winter squash and other starchy vegetables

• Super carb sensitive? ½ cup (4 oz.) beans as a starch, rather than a protein.

• Recommend whole grains and limited refined flours. And recommend whole grain cereal, bread and pasta.

Vegetable Servings Subtle outline

 

Vegetables

• 4-8 servings/day

• 1 serving is: 1 cup (4 oz. weighed) raw vegetables or ½ cup (3 oz. weighed) cook vegetables.

• Are you carb sensitive?

• IF NOT then include starchy vegetables, i.e., corn, peas, and winter squash as vegetable servings.

• If yes, then consume only low-starch vegetables as vegetable servings.

• If carb sensitive, then count peas, corn and winter squash as a starch/grain serving.

• Eat a variety of colors and types; include dark, leafy green vegetables daily.

Fruit Servings Subtle

Fruit

• 1-5 Servings/day

• 1 serving is 6 oz. (1 cup) of cut-up fresh fruit.

• ¾ cups or 6 oz. frozen, unsweetened fruit (after thawing)

• 2 oz. dried fruit (use sparingly)

• 1 moderate piece of fruit

• ½ cup canned fruit packed in its own juices

• Are you carb sensitive? Avoid cherries, grapes, pineapple, bananas & dried fruit

• Can substitute 1 fruit for 2 vegetable servings.

• Eat a variety of colors and types.

Fat Servings Subltle

Fat

• 2 – 3 servings/day

• 1 serving is 1 Tablespoon or .5 oz and equals 15-21 grams of fat

• Other sources of fat: 2 oz. avocado, 2 Tbs. cream cheese, 2 Tbs. shredded coconut, 1 Tbs. mayonnaise

• Use unsaturated fat or oil. Avoid saturated fats like margarine and butter.

Other food groups subtle

Other food groups

Alcohol (optional)

• 1 serving/day for women

• 2 servings/day for men

​​This is optional and considered a grain or sugar.

Sugar (optional)

• 0-5 servings per week

• 1 Tbs. sugar, jelly, jam, ½ cup sorbet and ices, 1 cup lemonade

• Use sparingly

Putting It All Together: I have more data and information on daily food requirements and creating your own food plan, but, I believe in not overwhelming people with too much information. So, I will post more on this later.

Thank you all for reading this! I know that it was a lot of information.

References: There are more, but this is a beginning

eat-well-bien-manger-eng

print_eatwell_bienmang-eng

view_eatwell_vue_bienmang-eng

USDAFoodPatternsSummaryTable

revisedfoodsmart

FGPPamphlet

ld90772_dailymealplanguide

calreqtips

intake

adhd_bklt

Food_Choices_and_Serving_Sizes_AMD

FoodLists

FoodMood

foodmoode2

healthyportions

 

Please note: This is not to be considered medical advice. I am merely passing on information that I have accumulated over the years. Everyone is unique and has their own personal experience. For any questions or concerns, I recommend consulting your health care provider.

 

 

Kidney Bean Curry

This is a variation of an earlier recipe for curried kidney beans. I was rushed in the morning, and I just put everything in the crockpot before going to work.

Unbelievably, everyone loved this. We ate it for dinner with rice and tacos.

Ingredients 

3 cups kidney beans 

1 onion, chopped 

1 can of diced tomatoes 

1 tablespoon salt, or to taste

1 tablespoon ginger 

2 tablespoons coriander 

1 teaspoon cumin, paprika 

1/2 teaspoon turmeric, pepper 

1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes 

1-2 cloves of garlic, crushed 

Water: 9 cups if using pressure cooker, to cover if using crockpot 

Optional: Fresh cilantro right before serving adds a special gourmet touch.

Instructions 

Sauté onions with spices and beans, until fragrant. Add tomatoes, with juice and water.

Stove top: bring to boil and let simmer until done. Add crushed garlic and adjust seasoning. 

In pressure cooker: 24 minutes to pressure and then released the pressure quickly by running cold water over the lid when done.

As I shared, I was time challenged this morning. I did not have the time to sauté everything first. I placed all the ingredients into the crockpot and it cooked on low all day. 

Here is my only picture:

  

Good thing I took it. I offered some to a visitor, who liked it so much, she requested to take some home. It’s now all gone.

An unexpected hit!

Enjoy!

Ideal Weight & Daily Calorie Intake 

In my last post, I explained how to have healthy, all natural food, even when time challenged. Still, many people struggle with how much to eat, and how much to weigh.

  
As with everything in life. There is no one size fits all. Everyone is unique and must find what works for them. I would argue that one size size fits all is really one size fits no one.

I keep trying to find a set food plan, that if followed, would lead to a healthy weight and maximum well-being. So far, I haven’t found one. So. I am going to give my opinion, based on my experience. It doesn’t mean, unfortunately, that I am right.

There is an abundance of information available on how to lose weight, how much to eat and how much to weigh. It can get quite technical. It is not only a question of what to eat, but how much for our body’s basic needs.

What is a healthy body weight?

Here are simple ways to calculate your ideal weight and daily calorie intake. Other formulas are available to calculate more precisely, but, sometimes you just need basic information.

Ideal weight formula:

For women, 100 lbs. for the first 5 feet, and then 5 lbs. for every additional inch and then +/- 10%.

For men: 106 lbs., for the first 5 feet and then 6 lbs. for every additional inch and then +/- 10%.

Example: for a woman who is 5 feet, 4 inches, her ideal weight would be: 

100 + (4X5)

=100+20

=120 lbs 

120+ 10%= 132

120- 10%=108

Her range would be: 108 – 132 lbs.

How much do I eat to maintain a healthy body weight?

Daily Calorie Intake Formula 

To quickly calculate your caloric needs, the formula is:

desired weight X 14-18 depending on your level of physical activity.

14 if you are sedentary, 18 if you are extremely athletic.

Example: for the 120 lbs., woman above: 120 lbs. X 14 =1,680 

120 X 18 = 2,160 calories per day.

So, depending on fitness and activity level, the recommended daily calorie intake would be 1,680 – 2,160 calories/day.

This is a rough estimate, and more precise calculations are available, if anyone is interested.

Here is a great link to a site which really explains this well:

fahey_lab_09_01

There are also people that I know that keep track of their food and activity level with various apps on their cell phone. Whatever works!

Average Calories Per Ounce For Various Food Groups

For educational purposes, I have calculated the average calories per ounce for various food groups.

Fruit: 16 calories/oz.

Vegetables: 10 calories/oz.

Beans: 30 calories/oz.

Grains: 30 calories/oz.

Animal protein: 50 calories/oz.

Fat: 100 calories/oz.

Personally, however, I do not recommend keeping track and counting calories. I think that it is a recipe for insanity and confusion.

How To Lose Weight 

I believe in eating a healthy varied diet, with moderate and appropriate portions. 

Cutting back on calories is part of a healthy eating plan to lose weight. I personally do not recommend excessive calorie restrictions. 

The goal is to change eating behaviors. Slow and steady changes are more likely to achieve long term success. Therefore, I recommend reducing your daily intake by no more than 400 calories per day. 

The key is to set a realistic goal, follow a healthy, all natural, whole food eating plan and aim for exercising an average of 20 minutes per day.

There is no mystery about how to lose weight. The secret is to eat less and preferably exercise more.

Balance is the key!

img_2673

References: Some of these are for future posts on this topic, but I added them here as well.

fahey_lab_09_01

USDAFoodPatternsSummaryTable

energy

Portion_Serving_Size_Chart_Eng

http://www.livestrong.com/article/178764-caloric-intake-formula/

http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-determine-your-calorie-needs.html

http://weightloss.about.com/od/eatsmart/a/blcalintake.htm

http://m.wikihow.com/Calculate-Your-Total-Daily-Calorie-Needs

http://www.manuelsweb.com/IBW.htm

http://www.csun.edu/~cjh78264/diabetes/pages/page32.html

https://www.supertracker.usda.gov/myplan.aspx

https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/lose_wt/eat/fd_exch.htm

https://www.fatsecret.com/calories-nutrition/usda/brown-rice-(long-grain-cooked)?portionid=45916&portionamount=1.000

http://www.vegan-weight-loss.com/calories-in-vegetables.html

http://www.vegan-weight-loss.com/calories-to-lose-weight.html

http://www.vegan-weight-loss.com/calories-in-fruit.html

http://www.vegan-weight-loss.com/calories-in-beans.html

http://www.vegan-weight-loss.com/calories-in-whole-grains.html

How To Eat A Healthy Balanced Diet, Even When Time Challenged

How To Eat A Healthy Balanced Diet, Even When Time Challenged.

I have a lot to say on this subject, but, I think that putting it all in one post is too much. So, I am going to post a series on this topic.

The new year has started and many people use this time of year to motivate themselves to recommit to living a more healthy lifestyle. As a nurse, my patients often ask me about how to eat right, or accommodate their health concerns. In particular, since I work in geriatrics, diabetic and cardiac wellness are important. I also used to work with people who were HIV Positive, which was a whole other set of food concerns. Then, there is my own personal life. So, I have lots of experience with planning and accommodating special diets and special needs.

Introduction

Food is like breathing. We need to eat, just like we need to breathe.

 

Breathe — you are alive

 

But, something as deceptively simple as breathing and eating is fraught with multiple layers of meaning.

Eating and breathing are what I call a pivot point of transformation. We eat food, which then becomes transformed into energy, which can be used by our bodies to nourish and sustain our life. A similar process also occurs when we breathe in oxygen. Both processes, breathing and eating are deceptively mundane. Upon examination, they are truly miraculous!

So, while identifying so many complexities, I thought I would take a few moments to discuss how to eat a healthy balanced diet, even when time challenged.

My basic rules are that I try to have something cooked and available in all major food groups at any given time. More specifically, I try to have rice, pasta, vegetables, a bean dish, and a chicken or fish prepared throughout the week.

To do this, I use my rice cooker, pressure cooker and crockpot on a regular basis. I use my microwave to cook vegetables as well. I always try to have frozen food, in particular vegetables, as a backup in a pinch.

I tend to do the bulk of my cooking for week preparing for our Sabbath. I am fortunate that my family does not demand fresh food every night. We eat leftovers from Shabbat if I am lucky, until Tuesday. After that, I fill in as needed.

We are not a one size fits all household. Therefore, I do not serve a single menu for our meals. As everyone has their own unique needs, I find it easier to just mix and match.

In addition to accommodating everyone’s individual preferences, we try to follow the principles of the Mediterranean Diet. This means that we try to eat whole grains, and plant-based foods (beans, nuts, seeds and vegetables) and limit animal protein and fat.

My husband eats red meat no more than once a week.  One meal a day consists of either fish, eggs or chicken. Another meal a day is completely vegan or plant based. I try not to cook with added fat and rely on spices to flavor food. I personally am allergic to wheat, dairy and eggs, so naturally, I do not eat them at all. Following this basic guide, it becomes possible to eat fast, healthy, easy and all natural food.

Below are some of the links that I accumulated on this topic. Feel free to explore any of them for more detailed explanations and information.

Enjoy!
References:

http://www.choosemyplate.gov/

http://www.nutrition.gov/smart-nutrition-101/myplate-resources

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/mediterranean-diet/art-20047801

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/dash-diet/art-20050989

http://oldwayspt.org/resources/heritage-pyramids/mediterranean-diet-pyramid

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/NutritionCenter/HealthyEating/Suggested-Servings-from-Each-Food-Group_UCM_318186_Article.jsp#.Vo7TfzbUjcs

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/WeightManagement/BodyMassIndex/Body-Mass-Index-In-Adults-BMI-Calculator-for-Adults_UCM_307849_Article.jsp#.Vo7TqDbUjcs

https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/files/docs/public/heart/dash_brief.pdf

http://www.pamf.org/handouts/dashdiet.pdf

http://chfs.ky.gov/NR/rdonlyres/5D24E0C9-3602-404D-AFDC-A7195B2BDD5F/0/DASHDIET.pdf

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/NutritionCenter/HealthyDietGoals/Suggested-Servings-from-Each-Food-Group_UCM_318186_Article.jsp#.Vo6bATbUjcs