North African Meatball Stew 

 

North African Meatball Stew

We are slowly digging out from under with our boxes. I have yet to fully unpack and comfortably organize the kitchen.

In addition, the move has brought up many emotions in my family. 

Last week, I found myself writing more on my non-food blog, coffeeklatchinsight.wordpress.com.

So, if anyone is interested in knowing how my week was last week, please stop by and visit!

I am open to feedback: I periodically think I should only have blog. But, my understanding of blogging rules is that a blog is best suited to one subject. Many readers find it too disconcerting to keep switching gears.

What is other people’s experience?

In the meantime, my cooking is even more rudimentary than before the move.

I am slowly getting up to speed, much to my family’s delight.

This is a dish that was inspired by Mona at healthyindiancooking.wordpress.com’s recipe on Easy Meatball Stew. The link is here for anyone who would like to see the original:

https://healthyindiankitchen.wordpress.com/2016/05/01/easy-meatball-stew/

It is a wonderful blog, full of my favorite food. I highly recommend  that you stop by for a visit!

However, although I love the original recipe, I had already packed up most of my spices. What was left were my spice mixes and the very basic spices. So, I combined Mona’s recipe with my previously posted North African Meatballs recipe. I am happy to say that this version is much better. “The potatoes and carrots give more flavor and texture to the sauce,” according to Raizel, my budding gourmet.

Ingredients 

Meatballs:

2 lbs. ground meat

1 tablespoon North African Spice Mix, or to taste

1 clove garlic crushed 

North African Spice Mix:

1 tablespoon salt, ginger, turmeric, coriander, cumin, garlic powder 

2 tablespoons paprika 

1/2 teaspoon pepper, cayenne, cloves 

1/4 teaspoon nutmeg 

Sauce

1 onion, chopped 

3-4 potatoes, peeled and cut in quarters

4 carrots, peeled and sliced on the diagonal. I prefer to keep slices on the larger side.

3 cups water or broth 

1 can diced tomatoes 

3 oz. tomato paste

Alternative: I have only used 6 oz. tomato paste, with success. It all depends on what I have available.

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon, or to taste

Salt and pepper to taste

2 cloves garlic, crushed 

Optional: chopped fresh parsley and/or cilantro 

Instructions 

Place all the ingredients for the sauce in a pot. I usually add the crushed garlic at the end.

Blend all ingredients for the meatballs together. Shape into balls and place in sauce.

Stove top: bring to boil and let simmer until done. Add crushed garlic and adjust seasonings to taste.

Crockpot. Cook on low until done. Less water is required.

In pressure cooker: 4 minutes to pressure and then use the quick release method by running cold water over the lid when done.

This week, I made it in the crockpot overnight. I adjusted the seasonings when I got up this morning before going to work.

Fresh herbs always add a gourmet touch, but I am not up to that yet.

Here are the pictures:

 

all set and ready to go in the crockpot


voila! the final product.

Everyone was soooooo happy!

I made it for this past Shabbat, and everyone wanted to have some. It was a hit!

Thank you Mona at healthyindiancooking.wordpress.com! 

And thank you to all my fellow bloggers for sharing your wonderful recipes. I feel like I am able to have a virtual glimpse of the kitchens of so many, all over the world!

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43 thoughts on “North African Meatball Stew 

  1. Claremary P. Sweeney says:

    Carol, I’m going to try this recipe. As far as blogging, I love food blogs and the ones that have a story along with them are most interesting. My blog started out last year centered around the importance of early reading with children and has moved on to many other topics. It seems to work for the people who follow me, although my posts on baseball are not so much a hit in countries outside of the US. I must study up on soccer, I guess? Clare

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pan says:

    I need to visit that blog ! This recipe will be made in my tiny kitchen, it has a wonderful blend of spices.. I’m a bit sensitive to hot spices.. I use cayenne but very sparingly.. What amount do you suggest I use, I trust your judgement ? 😊
    I’ve been wanting to try some African cuisine but haven’t gotten around to searching yet, and here you post one that already has me with anticipation 💛

    Liked by 3 people

    • Cooking For The Time Challenged says:

      Synchronicity! I recommend “a pinch” which might be 1/8 of a teaspoon. I do not love things too spicy either. I like to use 1/2 – 1/4 of whatever amount you would use of regular pepper. This is very simple and fast too. The funny thing was, everyone, including unexpected guests loved it! I usually don’t serve unconventional food to guests, but it was very popular. I never would have thought so.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Pan says:

        I will happily follow the pinch recommendation 😊
        In the mist of chaos you adapted your usual culinary routine without sacrificing quality.. I can easily say the same about you having 2 blogs.. Time has forced you to adapt the quantity and you’ve done so without sacrificing the quality.. Some things in life are just worth waiting for 😊
        And for me lately it’s a bonus, you should see my reading list.. I don’t want to miss great posts and it’s taking me forever to catch up with those I follow..
        I’m reading most recent first, just trying to stay somewhat current 😁

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Doctor Jonathan says:

    It is so nice to see how everyone shares and modifies different recipes to add their personal touches to the final product. I too follow the healthyindiankitchen and enjoy his skills and talents.
    Your final product looks truly amazing.

    Liked by 4 people

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